A 52-Week Photo Journey

… Mary Nell Moore's Photography


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Week 30 – #21. Industrial

Once a thriving industrial business, this is all that remains of Standard-Coosa-Thatcher Mills in Chattanooga, TN. It was one of many textile mills that dominated the local economy and built their own communities of employees around them. Excellent working conditions and high wages were paid to the 2,200 employees, one week of paid vacation, a retirement plan, and death benefit as reasons for the contentment of the workers.

In 1916, Standard, Coosa and Thatcher were three separate mills located directly beside each other. Coosa and Thatcher Spinning plants processed the incoming raw cotton and eventually spun the cotton to a finished yarn – which would be transported to the Standard Processing Plant for further refining (mercerizing) and dyeing.

Through the decline of the textile industry in America, changes in ownership, and eventual bankruptcy, the mills’ workforce was dramatically reduced in the early 1980’s and were completely closed by 2003. In February, 2015, the remaining buildings of the Standard-Coosa-Thatcher Mills were added to National Register of Historic Places. Plans are currently underway to convert the building(s) into Standard Coosa Artist Lofts: 170 Affordable Live/Work Rental units for artists and their families.

To the photo, I added a grungy industrial frame complete with nail heads.
Industrial HDR DSC_8370

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Week 29 – #46. Tell A Story

None of us will ever forget that fateful day, September 11, 2001, when the World Financial Center was attacked by terrorists. When in New York, I always make it a point to visit “Eleven Tears,” the work of art commissioned by American Express to honor 11 AMEX employees killed in the terrorist attack. To simply “tell a story” would be inadequate; thus, the below photograph.

This memorial entitled 11 Tears, occupies a lobby corner of American Express’ corporate headquarters at the World Financial Center. It “unites sky and ground, heaven and earth” and incorporates natural elements: water, light, quartz crystal and black granite. At the center is a 600 pound tear-shaped piece of Brazilian quartz, which was carved to have 11 sides, one for each AMEX victim.

The massive crystal is set into a stainless steel ring and suspended from the ceiling by 11 thin cables. Beneath the point of the upside-down tear is an 11-sided black granite pool; each side is inscribed with the name of an employee and a few words, selected by those who knew them best, to summarize the people they were. For example, the name most visible in my photograph, “Loretta Ann Vero,” has these words engraved in the pool above her name: Sincere, Thoughtful, Trustworthy, Loving And Loyal, Respected And Loved,

At random intervals, 11 drops of water fall from the ceiling into the pool above each name, creating intersecting ripples, “symbolizing the connections among the close-knit group of colleagues and friends.” The fountain is surrounded by benches of matching black granite where friends, loved ones, and people like me who never knew them, can sit and reflect upon their lives.

Visitors sitting there and looking through the windows find themselves gazing directly at the site where the 11 died, working as American Express travel counselors on the 94th floor of One World Trade Center. If you visit New York, I enourage you to visit what I call the “Pool Of Tears.” You will be touched in a way you never thought possible.­­­

46. Tell A Story DSC_0416


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Week 28 – #26. Mealtime

Recently, mealtime found me at The Terminal Brewhouse on Market Street in a section in Chattanooga, TN known as the Southside, which is undergoing gentrification.

A little history: The Terminal Station (Choo-Choo) opened in December of 1909 and created an immediate need for a nearby hotel to give comfort to the weary travelers. The very next year The Stong building was built next door and The Terminal Hotel came to life soon after. The hotel featured steam-heated rooms, fancy for that era, with meals served all hours in a café. Legend holds that through the years the Stong building was home to speakeasies during prohibition, illegal casinos and even a house of ill repute.

Sometime in the early 1940’s Chester Davis, a porter at the Terminal Station, saved his tips and purchased the Stong building becoming one of the first black business owners in Chattanooga. The building stayed in his family, housing many different businesses. It was purchased in 2006 by local raconteur Joe Sliger who immediately began restoring the property. Not long after, he found a crew interested in this historic building. This band of visionaries had, coincidentally, a vision for the wonderful old building. The walls and rafters seemed to cry out to these rugged, brilliant men. “Beer” said the walls “amazing food” said the rafters and so an idea was born.
Terminal DSC_8417


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Week 27 – #29. Moody

I woke up this morning and looked out the window hoping to see a beautiful day, but that was not in the cards. Instead of sunshine, it was foggy. I decided it is good to shoot outdoors in different kinds of weather so I gathered my equipment and Mike and I drove up to the top of Lookout Mountain hoping to get moody and atmospheric photos. We approached a narrow one-lane road beside which a sign was posted, “No Trespassing.” I have always been a curious-type person, so convinced Mike it would be okay if I walked down it for a possible photo op. Although nature provided plenty of low-hanging fog, I added a texture to the photo in post processing to give it just a little bit of added moodiness.
29. Moody DSC_8303