A 52-Week Photo Journey

… Mary Nell Moore's Photography


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Week 42 – #40. Rusty

This Huffy bicycle was secured to a tree alongside the sidewalk and it grabbed my attention not only because of the “rusty” fender braces but also because of the name of the manufacturer. This was the type bike I had as a child and I was amazed to see it still in service. Being a curious-type person, I did some research via Wikipedia and discovered “It has its roots in 1887 when George P. Huffman purchased the Davis Sewing Machine Company and moved its factory to Dayton, Ohio. They made their first bicycle in 1892. In 1924, George’s son, Horace M. Huffman, Sr., founded the Huffman Manufacturing Company. From then until 1949, Huffy continued to manufacture and sell bicycles under the ‘Dayton’ brand. During the 1930s, Huffy participated in the revival of the American cycling industry, during which Horace Huffman commented on a ‘change of attitude.’ Although Huffy dabbled in the high-end of the market, they never overcame their entry-level reputation. In 2004, Huffy sold its Huffy Sports division to Russell Corporation. Huffy Sports manufactures sporting goods, including the Hydra-Rib basketball systems used by the NBA. By 2006, Huffy had sold more than 100 million bicycles. Bicycles sold under the Huffy name are now made in China.” As I was bent over looking closely at the bike, a man walked by and told me the bikes can still be purchased at places like Target and Walmart. I was surprised.
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Week 41 – #12. Diamonds

While on a recent photo outing, I walked out on the Anna Maria pier and noticed this little boy playing with his daddy’s fish net basket. He picked it up and dropped it several times and watched in amazement as it slithered down onto the table. “There’s a theme,” I thought, so I swung my camera around and captured it as it fell to the table creating designs of little wire diamonds.
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Week 40 – #52. Yellow

A local Chattanooga artist, Kevin Bales, had a goal to get people to take another look at long neglected properties by decorating the walls of mostly industrial buildings. To bring his dream to reality, Kevin spent two years raising the funds on the first phase of the project known as “The McCallie Walls Mural Project.” Kevin, along with other local artists, worked together and the concept is Chattanooga’s first drive by art gallery on McCallie Avenue between Holtsclaw Ave. and Holly Street.  The artists were not restricted as to what could be painted on the buildings within those two blocks.  Since inception, the project has expanded to include the walls of buildings on other streets within the city. While in Chattanooga recently, I had a goal to photograph as many of the wall murals as I could find.  Although I photographed in excess of 40, I am certain I did not manage to photograph all of them but because of the vibrant yellow in the one below, I felt it best represented this week’s theme. In the near future, I plan to set up a separate website to display all of the walls I have photographed.
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Week 39 – #31. Neon

Pardon me boys, is that the Chattanooga Choo-Choo? In 1941, the famous Glenn Miller song, “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” was heard over radio stations across the nation, describing the journey of a train travelling from New York City along the Eastern Seaboard until its end at Terminal Station in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Terminal Station was opened in 1909 and was the largest and most modern station that the city had ever seen. Donn Barber, a student of the École des Beaux-Arts, designed the station, which featured a large, arched main entrance as well as a ceiling dome with a skylight. Brass chandeliers completed the rooms, bestowing an air of grandeur. During the 1950s and 1960s, rail traffic decreased significantly until 1970, when the last passenger train, the Birmingham Special, left Terminal Station.

A group of businessmen bought the station and surrounding property in 1972, renaming it, “The Chattanooga Choo Choo,” after the Glenn Miller song. The flashing neon sign can be seen for miles around downtown.
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