A 52-Week Photo Journey

… Mary Nell Moore's Photography


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Week 23 – #33. Old Timer

Happy New Year!

When I am in Chattanooga, I love riding through the historic district of Fort Wood. There are many homes built in the mid-to-late 1800’s that are being beautifully renovated, such as this “old timer” located at 800 Vine Street and originally built for Joseph H. Warner.

A document from the Historic American Building Survey says: “The house is a ‘high Queen Anne’ structure, with pressed red brick, stone trim, and solid oak paneling and woodwork in the interior. The hallways are large, and a fine attention to detail was paid to the terra-cotta and rusticated stone trim.

“This home was designed by architects Townsend and Stone with one idea in mind: extravagance. But its features also mask the luxurious interior, blending into the surrounding community with ease.

“Construction began on the home in 1890 and was completed in 1891.

“The real question is, then, who was this Joseph H. Warner?

“Born in Sumner County in the year 1842, Warner made his mark early by participating in the Civil War. In 1862, he joined Company A, 19th Tennessee Regiment Confederate Infantry, until he was captured at Missionary Ridge.

“He then spent the rest of the war in a federal prison.

“Upon his return, Warner sought to change the lives of Chattanoogans and launched an extensive hardware business.

“Eventually, that business would grow to include areas such as coal, iron, banking—Warner was one of the original organizers for Third National Bank—and railroad.

“Warner become known as ‘practically the founder and creator of the modern street railway in [Chattanooga],’ according to the HABS document.

“Before his death in 1923, Warner was the first city commissioner of public utilities, grounds and buildings, which is the reason Chattanooga’s Warner Park bears his name to this day.

“According to Maury Nicely in his ‘Chattanooga Walking Tour and History Guide,’ Warner ‘practically laid the first stone in the founding of a playground system in the city.’

“When built, the Joseph H. Warner home cost $26,000.”

Old Timer DSC_9475

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Week 26 – #36. Right Place At The Right Time

While attending the Brooksville Civil War Reenactment in Brooksville, FL, I was at the right place at the right time when I took this photo of the Union infantry firing upon the Confederate soldiers. I was especially happy to have captured the gun fire.
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50. It’s Bent Or Twisted

High atop Lookout Mountain is Point Park, from which the Battle Above The Clouds was fought during the Civil War in 1863. Walk down a few steps to the museum and you will learn about this area and the battle that took place there. From this point, you will also be able to see the most beautiful view that you can ever hope to see of the city of Chattanooga and the bent or twisted Tennessee River which winds its way through the downtown area.


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29. Stacked High

My husband is a Civil War buff and on this day we toured the Chickamauga Battlefield, the most significant Union defeat in the Western Theater of the American Civil War and which involved the second highest number of casualties in the war following the Battle of Gettysburg. On a slight hill, this monument (Wilder Tower) with its blocks stacked high to a total of 85 feet was built after the war and completed in 1904. It is a monument to Union Colonel John T. Wilder and his “Lightning Brigade.” Once inside and you climb to the top, you have a view of nearly all of the Battlefield. Construction was paid for by privately raised funds, much of which came from Wilder’s men. It is located near the site of Widow Glenn’s house when Rebel forces broke through at the Brotherton Cabin during the battle of Chickamauga (September 19 – 20, 1863). The Union Commander was William S. Rosecrans, for whom my Great Grandfather was a scout, and the Confederate Commanders were Braxton Bragg and James Longstreet.

If you find yourselves near Chattanooga, TN, especially if you have an interest in the Civil War, by all means take the time to drive through the Chickamauga Battlefield.