A 52-Week Photo Journey

… Mary Nell Moore's Photography


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Week 19 – #48. Urban Exploration

Each visit to Chattanooga my husband and I engage in its “urban exploration.” Looking back over the years, we continue to be amazed that Chattanooga, once called “the dirtiest city in America,” is today the fourth largest tourism market in Tennessee and has welcomed big companies like Amazon and Volkswagen to locate their facilities there. Not too many years ago, living downtown was unheard of but today it is a most desirable place to live. This photo was taken during a girls’ trip last October and as I walked across the glass bridge I could not help but notice the new condominiums and apartments which were not there a few years ago._MNM4620

 

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Week 13 – #52. Zig Zag

The Tennessee River Park is the crown jewel of Hamilton County’s Park system. Beginning at TVA’s Chickamauga Dam and stretching thirteen miles along the Tennessee River through downtown Chattanooga to the Southside District, this linear park offers users opportunities to enjoy a variety of activities and learning experiences.

The River walk itself is an eight-to-ten foot wide, landscaped and lighted concrete trail leading to parks and breath-taking views along the river. It is designed for use by both walkers and bicycle riders. This is a unique “Zig Zag” section in the downtown section of Chattanooga between the Walnut Street Bridge and the Market Street Bridge.

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Week 39 – #31. Neon

Pardon me boys, is that the Chattanooga Choo-Choo? In 1941, the famous Glenn Miller song, “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” was heard over radio stations across the nation, describing the journey of a train travelling from New York City along the Eastern Seaboard until its end at Terminal Station in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The Terminal Station was opened in 1909 and was the largest and most modern station that the city had ever seen. Donn Barber, a student of the École des Beaux-Arts, designed the station, which featured a large, arched main entrance as well as a ceiling dome with a skylight. Brass chandeliers completed the rooms, bestowing an air of grandeur. During the 1950s and 1960s, rail traffic decreased significantly until 1970, when the last passenger train, the Birmingham Special, left Terminal Station.

A group of businessmen bought the station and surrounding property in 1972, renaming it, “The Chattanooga Choo Choo,” after the Glenn Miller song. The flashing neon sign can be seen for miles around downtown.
Neon DSC_8441


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Week 30 – #21. Industrial

Once a thriving industrial business, this is all that remains of Standard-Coosa-Thatcher Mills in Chattanooga, TN. It was one of many textile mills that dominated the local economy and built their own communities of employees around them. Excellent working conditions and high wages were paid to the 2,200 employees, one week of paid vacation, a retirement plan, and death benefit as reasons for the contentment of the workers.

In 1916, Standard, Coosa and Thatcher were three separate mills located directly beside each other. Coosa and Thatcher Spinning plants processed the incoming raw cotton and eventually spun the cotton to a finished yarn – which would be transported to the Standard Processing Plant for further refining (mercerizing) and dyeing.

Through the decline of the textile industry in America, changes in ownership, and eventual bankruptcy, the mills’ workforce was dramatically reduced in the early 1980’s and were completely closed by 2003. In February, 2015, the remaining buildings of the Standard-Coosa-Thatcher Mills were added to National Register of Historic Places. Plans are currently underway to convert the building(s) into Standard Coosa Artist Lofts: 170 Affordable Live/Work Rental units for artists and their families.

To the photo, I added a grungy industrial frame complete with nail heads.
Industrial HDR DSC_8370


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Week 6 – #38. Powerful

Construction began in 1969 on the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant, a nuclear power plant located 20 miles north of Chattanooga, abutting Chickamauga Lake, on the Tennessee River. The facility is owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). It is the most productive of TVA’s four nuclear plants and the second most powerful electric plant in the entire TVA system.

Sequoyah was Cherokee, reportedly born in Tuskegee, a town at the confluence of the Tellico River and Little Tennessee River, upriver of the nuclear power plant. He is known for creating the Cherokee syllabary circa 1820. Many Cherokee sites were flooded during the TVA’s construction of Tellico Dam (1967-1979). Naming the site after a local Native American Indian was considered a small political token to the Cherokee in compensation for the dam-flooding and destruction of their historic sites that TVA required to control flooding on the Tennessee River. REF: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequoyah_Nuclear_Generating_Station

Powerful


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Week 4 – #A4. Patriotism

“How can this possibly happen in our town?” was the question asked over and over again on July 16th when a coward, Mohammad Youssuf Abdulazeez, opened fire on a recruiting station in Chattanooga, TN and then drove seven miles to a U. S. Navy facility where he rammed the gate, opened fire killing four U. S. Marines and wounding three others before he was fatally shot by a police officer. A U. S. Navy sailor later died from his wounds. While in Chattanooga this month, there was one place I wanted to visit…the U. S. Navy facility. As I stood at the entrance of the facility in the midst of a sea of American flags placed in both directions as far as the eye could see, I was overwhelmed with the showing of patriotism. With my heart pounding, chill bumps covering my body and tears streaming from my eyes, I photographed the scene, although a partial view. I have many friends and family members, past and present, who served or are presently serving in the military and I am deeply saddened as a result of this tragedy. I am asking that you keep the families of the deceased and wounded in your hearts and prayers.
Patriotic